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15 comments.

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RespondentResponse DateDetails
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 22
SNOMED is used in Mental health data set and emergency care data set so some case studies on these will help us understand the benefits of including SNOMED in returns
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 35
'The extracted coding will require manual quality assurance by clinical coding experts where the derivation confidence is not high, or the clinical risk of even relatively low error rates is considered too high.' Clarification is needed for this statement as there seem to be blurring of the lines between coding in a PAS system performed by a coder and terming in an EPR performed by a clinician. It is not the responsibility of a clinical coder to perform any type of quality assurance in terms of
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 15
'SNOMED CT enables the representation of clinically relevant information consistently and reliably in a way that can be processed by IT systems.' Can you provide us with some examples to support this as it would be good to understand the benefit it can bring to a Trust. And for each of the first three bullet points it would be great to have real life examples from secondary care so that the benefits can be sold to clinicians etc within the Trusts. Would also be good if you did similar for ICD an
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 23
If a benefit of SNOMED is its granularity why do you have subsets? Does this indicate SNOMED is too granular? Is there a risk by using sub-sets that this compartmentalises areas making them focus only on the terms they are interested in and leaving other terms underrecorded? I imaginee subsets will work really well in outpatients and at GP's but I'm concerned about its application in an inpatient setting where a patient may be under a speciality but have conditions affect them from a number of b
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 50
Has there been any published evidence that flowing SNOMED CT codes for Secondary Uses produces data that be successfully analysed and generates equivalent or better information than existing flows?
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 51
Achieving the AI & NLP goals described will be challenging without providing technical resources to support deep learning methods. For example, the national terminology service should provide custom concept embeddings based on arbitrary constellations of national terminologies (minimally SNOMED CT, dm+d, plus or minus various subsets).
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 16
You will have to ensure SNOMED CT reflects all of the terms used by a clinician to stop the need for local representations that are built to reflect the exact terminology used locally.
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 36
Is it the expectation that everything that would be recorded in an inpatient medical record using free text is input into the EPR using SNOMED CT - if so who's going to break this news to the clinicians? Presumably a visit to the GP surgery will often result in a single diagnosis being recorded in the EPR. This is seldom the case for inpatient activity, where a patient could be weeks or months and have multiple comorbidities and procedures spread across multiple Consultant Episodes. For the clin
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 17
'The standard is specific to the context of direct care and does not cover secondary uses returns or extracts or collections, which are governed by separate standards.' I found this confusing because I think in the phases above you do indicate that you ant to use SNOMED for secondary uses.
«anonymous»

Comment on Clinical Information Standards Specification SNOMED CT

  • Comment ID: 37
'Translation of SNOMED CT to classifications (for example ICD10/11) will be performed by national services, working closely with providers to resolve low confidence or highrisk translations'. There are around 19 million hospital episodes per year and somewhere in the region of 3000 clinical coders. NHS Digitial would need to employ thousands of classifications specialists to perform this function and they would need to have access to the individual patient records to verify the coding. Clinical
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